References

Adams, D., Harris, A., & Jones, M. S. (2016). Teacher-Parent Collaboration for an Inclusive Classroom: Success for Every Child. Malaysian Online Journal of Educational Sciences, 4(3), 58-72.

Anxiety Disorders May Force Students to Drop Out. (1995, October 10). Anxiety Disorders. https://www.mentalhealth.com/mag1/p5m-an01.html

Aouad, J., & Bento, F. (2019). A complexity perspective on Parent–Teacher collaboration in special education: Narratives from the field in lebanon. Journal of Open Innovation: Technology, Market, and Complexity, 6(1), 4. doi:10.3390/joitmc6010004

Barlow, David H. Anxiety and Its Disorders the Nature and Treatment of Anxiety and Panic. TPB, 2004.

Barrett, P. M., Dadds, M. R., & Rapee, R. M. (1996). Family treatment of childhood anxiety: A controlled trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 64(2), 333-342. doi:10.1037/0022-006X.64.2.333

Brendel, K. E., & Maynard, B. R. (2014). Child–Parent interventions for childhood anxiety disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Research on Social Work Practice, 24(3), 287-295. doi:10.1177/1049731513503713

Brook, C. A., & Schmidt, L. A. (2008). Social anxiety disorder: A review of environmental risk factors. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 4(1), 123-143.

Caballo, V. E., Arias, B., Salazar, I. C., Calderero, M., Irurtia, M. J., & Ollendick, T. H. (2012). A new selfreport assessment measure of social phobia/anxiety in children: The social anxiety questionnaire for children. Psicología Conductual, 20(3), 485.

Domschke, K. (2013). Anxiety disorders: Genetic mechanisms. E-Neuroforum, 4(3), 71-78. doi:10.1007/s13295- 013-0044-2

Donovan, C. L., Cobham, V., Waters, A. M., & Occhipinti, S. (2015;2014;). Intensive group-based CBT for child social phobia: A pilot study. Behavior Therapy, 46(3), 350-364. doi:10.1016/j.beth.2014.12.005

Ellen Sturm Niz Updated July 07, & Niz, E. (n.d.). Why and How to Teach Your Kids Mindfulness. Retrieved December 09, 2020, from https://www.parents.com/health/healthy-happy-kids/why-and-how-to-teach-kids-mindfulness/

Empson, M. J., and Walker, A. (2nd ed.). (2015). Atypical child development in context. London, UK: Palgrave.

“Facts & Statistics.” Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA, adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics.

Fader, S. (2018, April 15). Anxiety Medications: Types, Effects, and Precautions. Retrieved November 19, 2020, from https://www.betterhelp.com/advice/anxiety/anxiety-medications-types-effects-and-precautions/?utm_source=AdWords

Garcia-Lopez, L. J., Díaz-Castela, M. d. M., Muela-Martinez, J. A., & Espinosa-Fernandez, L. (2014). Can parent training for parents with high levels of expressed emotion have a positive effect on their child’s social anxiety improvement? Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 28(8), 812-822. doi:10.1016/j.janxdis.2014.09.001

Ginsburg, G. S., Siqueland, L., Masia-Warner, C., & Hedtke, K. A. (2004). Anxiety disorders in children: Family matters. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 11(1), 28-43. doi:10.1016/S1077-7229(04)80005-1

Ginsburg, G. S., & Schlossberg, M. C. (2002). Family-based treatment of childhood anxiety disorders. International Review of Psychiatry, 14(2), 143-154. doi:10.1080/09540260220132662

Ginsburg, G. S., La Greca, A. M., & Silverman, W. K. (1998). Social anxiety in children with anxiety disorders: Relation with social and emotional functioning. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 26(3), 175-185. doi:10.1023/A:1022668101048

Ginsburg, G. S., Silverman, W. K., & Kurtines, W. K. (1995). Family involvement in treating children with phobic and anxiety disorders: A look ahead. Clinical Psychology Review, 15(5), 457-473. doi:10.1016/0272-7358(95)00026-L

Goldin, P. R., Morrison, A. S., Jazaieri, H., Heimberg, R. G., & Gross, J. J. (2017). Trajectories of social anxiety, cognitive reappraisal, and mindfulness during an RCT of CBGT versus MBSR for social anxiety disorder. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 97, 1-13. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2017.06.001

Goldin, P. R., Morrison, A., Jazaieri, H., Brozovich, F., Heimberg, R., & Gross, J. J. (2016). Group CBT versus MBSR for social anxiety disorder: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 84(5), 427-437. doi:10.1037/ccp0000092

Goldin, P. R., Ziv, M., Jazaieri, H., Weeks, J., Heimberg, R. G., & Gross, J. J. (2014). Impact of cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder on the neural bases of emotional reactivity to and regulation of social evaluation. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 62, 97-106. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2014.08.005

Hjeltnes, A., Moltu, C., Schanche, E., Jansen, Y., & Binder, P. (2019). Facing social fears: How do improved participants experience change in mindfulness-based stress reduction for social anxiety disorder? Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 19(1), 35-44. doi:10.1002/capr.12200

Hofmann, S. G., & Otto, M. W. (2017). Cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder: Evidencebased and disorder specific treatment techniques (2nd ed.). Milton: Taylor and Francis.

Jozsef, P. (2020, January 14). Treating Social Anxiety Disorder with Mindfulness. Retrieved December 08, 2020, from https://psychcentral.com/blog/treating-social-anxiety-disorder-with-mindfulness/

Kaslow, N. J., Broth, M. R., Smith, C. O., & Collins, M. H. (2012). Family‐Based interventions for child and adolescent disorders. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 38(1), 82-100. doi:10.1111/j.1752-0606.2011.00257.x

kazemi, M. s., & Javid, M. m. (2010). The relationship between mental health and women’s tendency to suicide in sardasht. Procedia, Social and Behavioral Sciences, 5, 1381-1386. doi:10.1016/j.sbspro.2010.07.292

Khansari, D. N., Murgo, A. J. & Faith, R.E. (1990). Effects of stress on the immune system. Immunology today, 11, 170-175. DOI: 10.1016/0167-5699(90)90069-L

Knappe, S., Beesdo-Baum, K., & Wittchen, H. (2010). Familial risk factors in social anxiety disorder: Calling for a family-oriented approach for targeted prevention and early intervention. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 19(12), 857-871. doi:10.1007/s00787-010-0138-0

Knaus, W. J., Carlson, J., Shoup, A., & Kahn, B. (2014). The cognitive behavioral workbook for anxiety: A step-by-step program (Second ed.). Oakland, California: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

Lee, S., Palmer, S. B., Turnbull, A. P., & Wehmeyer, M. L. (2006). A model for parent-teacher collaboration to promote self-determination in young children with disabilities. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 38(3), 36-41.

Lima Osório, F. d. (2013). Social anxiety disorder: From research to practice. Hauppauge, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

Masia Warner, C., Colognori, D., & Lynch, C. (2018). Helping students overcome social anxiety: Skills for academic and social success (SASS). New York: Guilford Publications.

McEvoy, P. M., Rapee, R. M., & Saulsman, L. M. (2017). Imagery-enhanced CBT for social anxiety disorder. New York: Guilford Publications.

Meier, S. M., Mattheisen, M., Mors, O., Mortensen, P. B., Laursen, T. M., & Penninx, B. W. (2016;2018;). Increased mortality among people with anxiety disorders: Total population study. British Journal of Psychiatry, 209(3), 216-221. doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.115.171975

Morris, T. L., & Oosterhoff, B. (2016). Observed mother and father rejection and control: Association with child social anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 25(9), 2904-2914. doi:10.1007/s10826-016-0448-z

Neal, J. A., Edelmann, R. J., & Glachan, M. (2002). Behavioural inhibition and symptoms of anxiety and depression: Is there a specific relationship with social phobia? British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 41(4), 361-374. doi:10.1348/014466502760387489

Nores, M., & Barnett, W. S. (2010). Benefits of early childhood interventions across the world: (under) investing in the very young. Economics of Education Review, 29(2), 271-282. doi:10.1016/j.econedurev.2009.09.001

Rubin, K. H., Coplan, R. J., & Bowker, J. C. (2009). Social withdrawal in childhood. Annual review of psychology60, 141–171. doi: 10.1146/annurev.psych.60.110707.163642

Stadler-Heer, S. (2019). inclusion. ELT Journal, 73(2), 219-222. doi:10.1093/elt/ccz004

 Stein, M. B., Chen, C., Jain, S., Jensen, K. P., He, F., Heeringa, S. G., . . . On behalf of the Army STARRS Collaborators. (2017). Genetic risk variants for social anxiety. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 174(2), 120-131. doi:10.1002/ajmg.b.32520

Stein, M. B., Prof, & Stein, D. J., Prof. (2008). Social anxiety disorder. Lancet, the, 371(9618), 1115-1125. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(08)60488-2

Substance Use Disorders | Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA. (n.d.). Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Retrieved November 5, 2020, from https://adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/related-illnesses/substance-abuse

Thompson, B. L., & Waltz, J. A. (2007;2008;). Mindfulness, self-esteem, and unconditional selfacceptance. Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 26(2), 119-126. doi:10.1007/s10942-007-0059-0

Vitelli, E. M. (2015). Universal design for learning: Are we teaching it to preservice general education teachers? Journal of Special Education Technology, 30(3), 166-178. doi:10.1177/0162643415618931

“What Is Fear?: What Causes Fear?” Paul Ekman Group, 30 Jan. 2020, www.paulekman.com/universal-emotions/what-is-fear/.

What are the five major types of anxiety disorders? (2015, August 21). HHS.Gov. https://www.hhs.gov/answers/mental-health-and-substance-abuse/what-are-the-five-major-types-of-anxiety-disorders/index.html

World Health Organization. (2019, November 12). Substance abuse. https://www.who.int/topics/substance_abuse/en/

Videos

students and social anxiety videos

Social Anxiety

Your Brain on Social Anxiety Disorder

Is Anxiety Hereditary / Genetic Or Learned?

The Evolution of Inclusion: The past and future of education

Inclusion and education : All means all animation

8 Signs You Might Have Social Anxiety

Through the eyes of someone with social anxiety disorder

parents behaviour and social anxiety videos

Parenting Styles and their Effects on Children

Social Anxiety: How to Deal With Toxic Family

What Your Attachment Style Says About Your Personality

Parent training videos

How Parents Can Help With Child Anxiety | UCLA CARES Center

Anxiety in Youth: A family-based treatment (Webinar)

Criticism from parents affects how children’s brains respond to emotional information

Parental Involvement in Special Education Services

Teacher-parent collaboration videos

What is Self Determination Theory?

SDLMI Probe _ EG

Interventions videos

What is early intervention?

How Important is a Diagnosis?

7 Signs And Symptoms Of Social Anxiety Disorder

Treatment of Social Anxiety Disorder

10 MINDFUL EXERCISES | How To Be Present

Train Your Brain: Mindfulness Meditation for Anxiety, Depression, ADD and PTSD

Mindful Breathing Meditation (5 Minutes)

5 Min Guided Meditation Body Scan

A Simple Exercise to Practice Mindfulness Anywhere in Nature

Gratitude Meditation for Kids | Guided mindfulness practice for kids

3 EASY MINDFULNESS ACTIVITIES FOR KIDS | Mindfulness for Kids

students and social anxiety books

social anxiety:

Hofmann, S. G., & DiBartolo, P. M. (2014). Social anxiety: Clinical, developmental, and social perspectives (3rd ed.). Burlington: Elsevier Science.

The book integrates examinations of social anxiety, shyness, and embarrassment with the research on social anxiety disorder subtypes, biological theories and cognitive-behavioral or pharmacological treatment outcome studies.

Inclusion:

Hart, S. (2016). inclusion Jessica Kingsley Publishers

The book explores how play within children’s groups can be facilitated in order to foster emotional and empathic capacities, how to overcome common challenges to inclusion in schools and introduces practical, creative approaches to cultivating a sense of unity and team spirit in children’s groups.

Universal design for learning:

Meyer, A., Rose, D. H., & Gordon, D. (2014). Universal design for learning: Theory and practice. Wakefield, Massachusetts: CAST Professional Publishing.

The book has a new insights from research on learner differences and how human variability plays out in learning environments, Research-based discussions of what it means to become expert at learning, First-hand accounts and exemplars of how to implement UDL at all levels and across subjects using the UDL Guidelines.

Articles

Barrett, P. M., Dadds, M. R., & Rapee, R. M. (1996). Family treatment of childhood anxiety: A controlled trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 64(2), 333-342. doi:10.1037/0022-006X.64.2.333

Brook, C. A., & Schmidt, L. A. (2008). Social anxiety disorder: A review of environmental risk factors. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 4(1), 123-143.

Caballo, V. E., Arias, B., Salazar, I. C., Calderero, M., Irurtia, M. J., & Ollendick, T. H. (2012). A new selfreport assessment measure of social phobia/anxiety in children: The social anxiety questionnaire for children. Psicología Conductual, 20(3), 485.

Ginsburg, G. S., Siqueland, L., Masia-Warner, C., & Hedtke, K. A. (2004). Anxiety disorders in children: Family matters. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 11(1), 28-43. doi:10.1016/S1077-7229(04)80005-1

Ginsburg, G. S., & Schlossberg, M. C. (2002). Family-based treatment of childhood anxiety disorders. International Review of Psychiatry, 14(2), 143-154. doi:10.1080/09540260220132662

Ginsburg, G. S., La Greca, A. M., & Silverman, W. K. (1998). Social anxiety in children with anxiety disorders: Relation with social and emotional functioning. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 26(3), 175-185. doi:10.1023/A:1022668101048

Ginsburg, G. S., Silverman, W. K., & Kurtines, W. K. (1995). Family involvement in treating children with phobic and anxiety disorders: A look ahead. Clinical Psychology Review, 15(5), 457-473. doi:10.1016/0272-7358(95)00026-L

Goldin, P. R., Morrison, A. S., Jazaieri, H., Heimberg, R. G., & Gross, J. J. (2017). Trajectories of social anxiety, cognitive reappraisal, and mindfulness during an RCT of CBGT versus MBSR for social anxiety disorder. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 97, 1-13. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2017.06.001

Goldin, P. R., Ziv, M., Jazaieri, H., Weeks, J., Heimberg, R. G., & Gross, J. J. (2014). Impact of cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder on the neural bases of emotional reactivity to and regulation of social evaluation. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 62, 97-106. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2014.08.005

Lee, S., Palmer, S. B., Turnbull, A. P., & Wehmeyer, M. L. (2006). A model for parent-teacher collaboration to promote self-determination in young children with disabilities. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 38(3), 36-41.

Morris, T. L., & Oosterhoff, B. (2016). Observed mother and father rejection and control: Association with child social anxiety, general anxiety, and depression. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 25(9), 2904-2914. doi:10.1007/s10826-016-0448-z

Thompson, B. L., & Waltz, J. A. (2007;2008;). Mindfulness, self-esteem, and unconditional selfacceptance. Journal of Rational-Emotive and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, 26(2), 119-126. doi:10.1007/s10942-007-0059-0

Apps and activities

Social anxiety self-check:

this is a useful tool to identify social anxiety.

Camp Cope A-Lot: 

based on cognitive behaviour therapy, Camp Cope-A-Lot offers an online program for children with social anxiety disorders.

visual schedules:

The visual schedules help children with social anxiety by making daily events predictable and structured. Therefore, their anxiety will reduced due to predictability and a sense of controlling over the situations.

Free download

Activities:

These are 10 activities to support kids with anxiety disorders.

kit:

This Resilience Kit is a collection of printable worksheets, posters activities, and coloring pages designed to help children develop grit, resilience, and perseverance.

SAD

Children with SAD may be neglected or overprotected by their families. Empson (2015) stated that the sensitive period (between age 5 and puberty) is when a person is maximally ready to receive environmental stimuli, which is the best time for child development. Children experience different situations in their caregiving environment at critical periods, and they may be vulnerable or resilient in those situations. Early identification and intervention must be implemented for the children who are at risk during the critical period (the period during which children’s achievement and development are at the highest level). Children with social anxiety are often considered as being shy in the classroom. On the one hand, shy children are more likely to be subjected to overprotective parenting which can undermine their autonomy and ability to succeed in developmental challenges (Epson, 2015). On the other hand, there is a clear association between social anxiety and family rejection. The children who are neglected by their parents or with unsecured attachment usually show social and behavioral disorders such as SAD.

About me

As a student who studies Master of Special Education, inclusion means a lot to me and during my study, I have learned a lot about inclusion and how to support children with varied needs in an inclusive classroom. The main goal is to make children feel they are part of their community and have a sense of belonging. To reach this goal, many areas that need to be studied. I, however, as an adult who experienced social anxiety in her childhood, decided to have research about social anxiety in children which is caused by the home environment, and how teachers at school and parents at home can collaborate in order to support children with social anxiety. Based on the literature review in my study, I tried to find effective interventions to support children with social anxiety and the strategies for both parents and teachers to help children. I chose to design a website because I would like to make the information in my study available for all people all around the world. My website is easy to access, easy to use, time-efficient, and it includes free resources to use. With my ambition of having a world full of happy smiling faces on each child’s face, I chose the name of my website’ Happy Children’. There are interventions for both parents and teachers, free resources to download, and a discussion board to talk about different experiences and ideas on my website. Since the children’s mental and physical health is important for both parents and teachers, having healthy and happy children leads to happy parents, teachers, and society.